11

I've periodically searched for an open-source alternative to the awesome suite of Atlassian products and always come up nearly empty. This time, the only option that seemed to exist is Tiki Wiki CMS Groupware.

A great selling point of Tiki is that it is a fully-integrated suite of components which ought to take the pain out of trying to get multiple distinct products to work together. (In my experience with Atlassian, even getting their own products to work together sometimes required some voodoo.)

The big features and components I'm looking for are . . .

Must-Have Components:

  • Wiki
  • VCS browser (Git, SVN)
  • Ticketing system

Nice-to-Have Components:

  • Code review tool

Features:

  • Open-source
  • Good integration between the various components
  • VCS integration
  • Document management/uploads
  • User profiles
  • User subscribe to changes, i.e., watch documents
  • Something like Confluence spaces, where orgs or people have their own site/blog/etc. that they can update with news and documentation
  • Facility for collaborative documentation
  • . . . hierarchically arranged documents/pages
  • . . . ability to print a section or group of pages as a distinct publication
  • Confluence is not a wiki anymore, the wiki-text has been replaced with XHTML. But having a wiki is a good requirement even if Atlassian no longer offers one. – chicks Feb 17 '16 at 4:05
  • Gogs? But I don't know if it has a wiki... – wb9688 Feb 17 '16 at 5:45
  • Are the items in your "Features" list must-haves, or nice-to-haves? – Nicolas Raoul Feb 15 '17 at 12:15
5

TRAC has wiki, bug tracker, code viewer, all with markup to interlink.

Or, there is its fork Apache Bloodhound.

All written in Python, plenty of plugins. Very mature.

BTW Trac wiki is much closer to original idea, plain text with markup. Easier to parse from outside to create plugins.

  • Please describe how it fits all of the bullet points of the question, thanks! – Nicolas Raoul Feb 15 '17 at 12:16
  • All of them (except possibly last two), and MoinMoin wiki is much more flexible than Confluence (uses markup included in plain text, to is much easier to parse). Also, is written in Python, much easier to hack. – Peter M. - stands for Monica Feb 15 '17 at 16:33
5

I've played with Phabricator a little bit, but it's been over a year. It seems to have set its sights high with lots of components and functionality.

  • 1
    Please describe how it fits all of the bullet points of the question, thanks! – Nicolas Raoul Feb 15 '17 at 12:15
  • Phabricator is not open source. It is not even free for businesses – Mawg May 16 '17 at 7:49
  • 1
    @Mawg github.com/phacility/phabricator Phabricator is very much open source and free for business. – RusHughes Oct 26 '17 at 5:54
  • I do apologize. Thanks for correcting me (+1). I can't understand how I made that mistake (unless things have changed since I commented 18 months ago). I have checked and this page says that local hosting is open source and free, while hosted is $20/user/month. – Mawg Oct 26 '17 at 8:18
2

That's simple - GitLab - i know you're looking at another direction, but if you think about it, GitLab has great implementation opportunities beyond building software. It has most of the features listed, as its aim is to address broad list of use cases, covering the entire project life-cycle. You can check about.gitlab.com/features for an extensive overview. What I meant by 'implementation opportunities beyond building software' is that the system (community edition) can be used either as-is, or you can build upon it collaborative solutions which are non-code oriented. (e.g., O'Reilly Atlas)

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