I'm looking for a web application that tracks changes on websites and provide them as RSS feeds. The detection of site / site-part structure can be semi-automatic, but should not be too time-consuming.

Optimal would be

  • a free version, which is not too limited in terms of feed number and query interval or
  • a one-time purchase application or
  • a self-hosted tool

closed as too broad by danijelc, Izzy, Nick Wilde, Flyk, aman207 Feb 22 '14 at 19:17

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • With automatic/semi-automatic tools, you'll certainly get at least some false positives from other than actual content changes. Just saying. – Olli Feb 5 '14 at 8:51
  • Which RSS variant do you mean? Or is it "feed" in general (no matter which format), which would include Atom? – unor Feb 5 '14 at 19:17
  • Thanks for pointing me to this. It would be nice if my current reader (Feedly) supports the format. – Jens Piegsa Feb 5 '14 at 19:22
  • You should give us some restrictions, "anything goes" or "too basic" requirements are no good since almost everything available would fit. If you already had experiences with something write what you liked/didn't like as requirements of your question. – Braiam Feb 22 '14 at 15:45
  • @Braiam: I've tried page2rss few days now to see whether it fits. When I make some more experiences leading to advanced requirements, I'll come back on this. – Jens Piegsa Feb 22 '14 at 16:13
up vote 7 down vote accepted

There are several services that allow you to monitor sites without feeds.

I have used page2rss before and it doesn't have any kind of limitation. Google recommended that folk who were using its page migration option before move over to it - it's fairly simple

Page RSS Search

You simply put the URL in, and it converts it to a RSS feed. It does get a bit confused between minor and major changes on occasion, but it's a fairly robust site that dosen't miss anything major

Other paid services like Feedity exist.

  • 3
    could you elaborate a bit more about what the two recommendations you list can in terms of features? Why do you think they are great? How is the interface of them? – Angelo Fuchs Feb 9 '14 at 17:33

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