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I'm after a really simple version of MS project.

In MS project, I can add a resource (a person), set their working hours per week and cost. This means when I add items to the project and assign them all to this 1 resource, by simply changing the hours working per week I can see the completion date and cost (a simple hourly rate (salary) in order to know a cost for this very simple project).

I've tried MS project, but the cost is too steep and it's over kill. Plus, I'd rather it be online software.

Tomsplanner (web) seemed OK but doesn't appear that you can add resources...

Please note, I'm fine with paying, but, this project is probably short lived, so it's not worthwhile with a large investment, but anything with short contracts/pay per month may be a great solution (or free).

  • To give an answer, I'd better need to understand your definition of "cost". There is a) the cost of human resources, their salary, which needs to be paid anyway, whether they work on something or not. Then we have b) the cost of the resources as they contribute to the project, which is effort*hourly rate. Next there is c) itemized cost, e.g. for machines or physical things. Do you also need to track d) customer payments which are deducted from other costs? – Thomas Weller Nov 6 '15 at 12:49
  • I updated @Thomas, it's just a salary. There is no complication, as per if delivered on time, if the project was accepted or not etc. But if I add all the 'items' in the project, I can see the expected finished date, and an idea of the cost! – MyDaftQuestions Nov 6 '15 at 14:03
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How about Gantter?

  • it's free,
  • it's web based,
  • is very close to MS Project in its functionalities, so much so that it allows you to import MS Project files,
  • has an extensive set of project management and scheduling features,
  • supports many basic features such as tasks types, effort-driven tasks, calendars, constraints, notes, resources, and predecessors,
  • enables you to do resource management (basically, you can do what you've described in your use case),
  • looks quite straightforward to use.

Maybe worth a look.

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