5

I would like to find a good quality Linux program to monitor the hardware sensors of a computer. I would like the most of this features, if possible:

  • Both command-line and GUI, or at least command-line.
  • Remote managing (via network).
  • Logging results to file.

I have tested sensors from lm-sensors Debian package:

fam15h_power-pci-00c4
Adapter: PCI adapter
power1:      124.92 W  (crit = 124.92 W)

k10temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
temp1:         +6.8°C  (high = +70.0°C)
                       (crit = +90.0°C, hyst = +87.0°C)

radeon-pci-0100
Adapter: PCI adapter
temp1:        +37.0°C  

radeon-pci-0200
Adapter: PCI adapter
temp1:        +33.0°C  

radeon-pci-0500
Adapter: PCI adapter
temp1:        +37.0°C  

but AIDA64 (for Windows only) outperforms it:

enter image description here

Isn't there anything so valuable for Linux?

  • I use sensors. On a side note, I wonder if the sensors lose their calibration and that they are not re-calibrated. How much of an error would I have? – dearN Mar 20 '14 at 14:32
4

Let me repeat a recommendation I already placed twice: Monitorix. It can be used as

But it also monitors "local resources" such as CPU, disks, and – sensors:

Complete LM-Sensors and GPU temperatures Disk drive temperatures and health
Monitorix: Complete LM-Sensors and GPU temperatures / Disk drive temperatures and health (source: Monitorix; click to enlarge)

Monitorix makes use of a lot of back-ends, such as the already mentioned lm-sensors Debian package. It also supports HP ProLiant System Health, NVIDIA temperatures and usage, plus several more. I'm using it for quite a while now, and found the software that convincing I volunteered to maintain the Debian packages for it (← disclosure). Monitorix saved my day more than once, as its "raw overview" makes it pretty easy to track down problems and to see where to have a closer look at. In your case: find the graph with the highest peak to see which component is "overheating", for example.

Monitorix is a web-based tool, so you won't have that "interactive view" from the AIDA64 screenshot in your question. But AIDA64 might miss the graphs.

To your requested features:

  • Both command-line and GUI, or at least command-line: Monitorix is a Perl program, which can be managed via command-line (start/stop, editing its plain-text config, etc.)
  • Remote managing (via network): sure, simply get a command-line via the network (e.g. via SSH)
  • Logging results to file: kind of. Monitorix uses RRDtool for logging, so you'll have RRD files (Round-Robin-Database). But it also offers to send alerts, and more – so this might be "abused" to plug in some other logging, when needed.
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.