1

I developed a Windows desktop application that uses HTTPS/HTTP, and I want to see whether it works even when the Internet is only accessible via a proxy.

If I understand proxies correctly, to test this I would need to:

  1. Set up a proxy on the Windows machine (or elsewhere),
  2. Prevent my Windows application from connecting to HTTPS/HTTP ports,
  3. Test,
  4. Reverse the settings modified in steps 1 and 2.

Is there any simpler solution to replace steps 1,2,4?
Maybe a tool that performs 1,2,4 with the push of a button?

1

IMHO you don't need a proxy to test this, if you just want to know whether it will use the proxy (and you don't need to know whether it actually works).

The tool of your choice is Wireshark. First, make sure your Internet connection works and find out the IP address of the website that you're going to connect to:

nslookup example.org

Start Wireshark and enter the following as display filter:

tcp && ip.addr == <what you found out>

Disable the proxy (if not disabled anyway), then let your application connect to the URL. Expected output: Wireshark shows traffic, i.e. the application connects to the IP directly.

Now enable the proxy, then let your application connect to the URL. Expected output: Wireshark does not show traffic any more, i.e. the application does not connect to the IP directly.

Then apply proxy settings to your PC (the IP needn't exist) and change the filter to

tcp && ip.addr == <IP of the proxy>

Let your application connect to the URL. Expected output: Wireshark shows traffic, i.e. the application connects to the proxy.

Wireshark Proxy detection

|improve this answer|||||
0

If you developed the application, it should be fairly simple to tell if it supports proxies.

If you used WinInet for network access, it supports proxies, and uses the Internet Connection settings (e.g. that you'd get from Edge, IE, or Chrome).

What library did you use for HTTP/HTTPS?

Disclaimer: I work for Qbik who are the authors of WinGate Proxy Server

|improve this answer|||||
  • I used the standard Microsoft .NET 4.0 methods for HTTP/HTTPS. – Nicolas Raoul May 30 '16 at 2:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.