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We are trying to create districts or working areas for our employees so that they have roughly the same amount of employees in each

I have all the addresses but i'm looking for something that will draw district boundaries preferably something just built on top of google earth or google maps

any ideas

Platform either web or Windows (7-8-10) I would be willing to pay but prefer free In this case I am looking for United States

the data is small enough (few hundred rows) I would change it to match the softwares requirement

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    Welcome to Software Recommendations! Currently your question is a bit thin. Could you edit it to contain some more specific information? What Operating System(s) do you use? Are you looking for gratis software or are you willing to pay for it (how much)? In what format do you have the address data? For which country? In what format would you like to have the output? As addresses, postal codes? An image? Would you accept a library and code the frontend yourself? You do have an interesting question. I hope to see you around. – Angelo Fuchs Feb 25 '15 at 9:38
  • "create districts or working areas for our employees so that they have roughly the same amount in each" - amount of what? Area (square miles/km)? inhabitants? Established business contacts? Businesses of the type with which you deal (for allocating sales areas)? – Mawg Feb 25 '15 at 13:50
  • Updated the original question to address your questions – Crash893 Feb 25 '15 at 21:57
  • Still a little unclear. Are these districts defined by local government, or by you/the program which you are seeking? If by you, which criteria decide them? – Mawg Feb 26 '15 at 9:02
  • Sorry some of the problem is im not sure exactly how to describe it. Basicly we have 400 employees in and around Washington DC. I want to clump them together in groups in N amount of groups. – Crash893 Feb 26 '15 at 14:13
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A couple things come immediately to mind, not knowing what granularity you need. Such as is it at the zipcode level, the street level, and the state level, etc.

MapPoint: Microsoft MapPoint has a specific function for such things that any version that can run on your current OS should be adequate. It uses BING Maps vs. Google Earth. It had its limitations but I still found it useful and being a Microsoft Product was something I could easily get approved for use in our environment. It unfortunately has been discontinued on 12/31/2014, but it is still available from retailers and older versions are near free on places like eBay. Even MapPoint 2000 I believe had a basic 'territory' function.

R: R, and highly recommend just using R Studio especially if you are not a coder, is a great and probably better if you are willing to do some of the data preparation lifting yourself, which I think will be the case in any program. Then once the data is prepared you could use a package like RgoogleMaps to do the plotting and adjust the data and visualize it in the same code. If you need a basic intro to R, DataCamp and to a lesser degree Lynda.com have some good intro tutorials on it and then there are numerous blog posts out there about plotting things on maps.

Tableau: Tableau is a great and versatile program and can do some basic analytics too. It is not cheap, but if you have a limited single purpose use of it and do not mind your displays being public (private link, but if they have the link it can be found) then the terms of service for Tableau Public might work for you (you would need to check).

Excel: There is also just doing it in Excel.This blog posting of GIS Exchange talks about using MapCite, BeGraphics, MapLand, and Esri with excel to create maps. I have not used any of these.

Microsoft also lists Power Map for Excel as an alternative to MapPoint available in newer versions of Office 365 but I do not have the latest version with this feature but it looks very promising.

What I have prepared my data in Excel and then used a personal map inside of Google Docs to import the data but this has only provided location plots which I then used a graphics program like Photoshop or even SnagIt to then shade in the areas depending on presentation quality required.

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You could use python and either the matplotlib basemap toolkit or one of the python Google Maps APIs.

A very good example that plots the number of blue plaques in each London ward is here which results in: blue london

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