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I own a Sony Z1 mobile phone and the battery drains way too fast. I have Android 4.4 version, not rooted.

Does anybody know what app could be successfully used to identify and and manage power consumption?

  • 1
    There's already a list of power consumption by application in the Settings menu. What extra information are you hoping for? – Gilles 'SO- stop being evil' Jan 10 '15 at 13:23
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You can find a list of apps for that on my site, filed under System Monitoring. I will pick one example here I feel should match your case:

SystemPanel is a system monitoring utility keeping more than just the "consumption summary", but allows you to analyse a lot of things.

SysPanel SysPanel
SysPanel screenshots (click images for larger variants)

With SysPanel you can monitor your system (the paid version also allows for background monitoring and comparision of historical data). The first screenshot is already a little aged, but illustrates how you can break down information to identify a culprit: You can see the selected app was using 10% of all CPU cycles between 6pm and 8pm, while the device was not charging, effectively reducing battery charge. In this time frame, the device was rarely used – so all that obviously happened "in background".


When it comes to manage the "evil eaters", take a look at Battery Savers. If you've identified apps consuming your resources "in background" without you wanting that (in the above example, it was rather wanted activity: GPS tracking), I'd recommend Greenify. You can tell this app to take care for your identified culprits, so they will be "hibernated" while in background. Greenify itself also lets you identifiy possible candidates for that.

Greenify Greenify Greenify
Greenify (source: Google Play; click images for larger variants)

While Greenify works fine on non-rooted devices, it unleashes its full powers with root and the Xposed Framework.


There are plenty of different other approaches to save your juice. Deciding whether one of those matches your needs, would require much more details from your end. Most "battery savers" follow one or more of the following strategies to reduce battery consumption:

  • dim down your display
  • cutting all network connections while the display is off, optionally enabling them in intervals to allow checking for new mail etc.
  • playing with CPU frequencies (root required)
  • killing all apps when switching the display off (not recommended)
  • allowing you to define profiles you can switch between (each with different settings for e.g. GPS, networking, display brightness, etc.)

As already pointed out, you can check my list of Battery Savers for a selection, where reviews etc. are linked to many candidates, making it easier to narrow down your search.

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Snapdrago BatteryGuru is my personal favourite.

  • Truly increase battery life
  • Turn of apps that run in the background for no reason
  • Backed by Qualcomm
  • Regularly Updated
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I recommend you to ROOT your device and remove all the unwanted app that you're not using.

Becuase your device is not ROOTED you can use

Battery Drain Analyzer

enter image description here

is a sophisticated app that tracks your battery and power usage behind-the-scenes to give you an idea of what’s using the most juice. Think of it as Android’s built-in battery usage app on steroids; it offers tons of statistics and numbers that should satisfy even the most demanding power user.

As the name implies, the app will analyze app and power usage and let you know which apps are draining the most power, or if it’s even an app that’s causing battery drain. The Analyzer screen shows what percentage of app drain is caused by what system activity, whether that’s your screen, applications, phone idling, WiFi or Bluetooth radios, etc. Below that, it shows which applications are consuming the most battery, including the infamous Android OS battery drain, rated by percentages. If Facebook is using 65% of the battery drain caused by apps, for example, you’ve got a pretty good idea of what’s causing your power usage.

Aside from the basic analyzing, the app also offers a handful of numbers and graphs that can be extremely helpful. There are several graphs that show a history of your battery life, like how long your battery lasted every day for the past two weeks. For example, you can see that you managed to go 30 hours on a single charge on Wednesday but only 20 on Thursday, so whatever you were doing on Wednesday was easy on your battery. Information like that is extremely handy for adjusting your usage habits to maximize battery life.

Another really great feature is the battery life estimation the app will display. It takes into account your usage habits and the current running apps and active radios and gives you a rough estimate of how long your battery will last and how quickly it’s discharging. This can be handy to see if your battery is going to last you until the end of the day or if you’re going to need to find a wall outlet in the next few hours. It also offers profile switching which will control certain radios, like Bluetooth or WiFi or cell radios, and application syncing depending on which profile is selected. A day profile may sync less often but keep Bluetooth on for connecting to a headset, for example, to conserve battery.

Wakelock Detector

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A major culprit of battery drain that can be hard to track down is wakelock. There are two types of wakelock. Partial wakelock is essentially when an application keeps your device from going into a deep sleep when your screen is off, which can cause abnormally high battery drain. Ideally, you want your device to hit a deep sleep state soon after the screen turns off to get the most out of your battery life, but sometimes apps that are poorly written or syncing too often can mess that up. Full wakelock is when an application keeps the screen awake (and consuming battery) past the point when your device would normally automatically turn the screen off, such as some music playing apps or alarm clock apps. Wakelock Detector is an application that’s designed specifically to help you identify a wakelock problem.

Wakelock Detector shows a list of all applications on your device that are causing some types of wakelock since your last reboot. It shows screens that will tell you how long an application has kept your device awake, sorted by which apps have caused the most wakelock, as well as how many times each app has woken your device out of deep sleep. A single wakelock for 10 seconds in an hour wouldn’t be as bad as 10 wakelocks for 10 seconds in an hour, for instance. At a glance, this information can help you track down an app that may be syncing information too often, which could cause your wakelock issues.

Of course, it wouldn’t really be a great Android app without some really technical features, and Wakelock Detector has plenty of detailed system information if you really want to start digging into battery analyzing. You can do things like look at your apps based on their current application state, such as running or suspended, show CPU and screen wakelocks, sort your apps by name, wakelock time, running state, or view “Wakeup Triggers” on your device that cause higher amounts of wakelock. If you think wakelock is the problem behind your poor battery life, Wakelock Detector should be on the top of your list for apps to try out.

Battery Doctor: - Ans: Franck Dernoncourt's and Snapdrago BatteryGuru :- Ans: Adi are also there in my list

Battery apps are a dime a dozen in the Play Store, but these apps stand out for a handful of reasons when it comes to analyzing and managing your battery life


More Info @ How to extend your Android’s battery life

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You can use Battery Doctor:

  • free
  • identify and and manage power consumption

enter image description here

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