3 deleted 85 characters in body
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You may think you want that, but unless your job is to teach eight year olds, you're going to wish you just stayed with a real IDE like IntelliJ IDEA.

Reasons:

  1. Java IDEs are big and full of features because working with Java without those features is a giant pain.

  2. Code-completion is great. Having something check your style, suggest how to repair your project when it breaks is great. Recovery from errors is a major part of what IDEs give you.

  3. Project build management without an editor means writing an Ant script in XML or in Maven, by hand. Java builds don't happen without build systems, except for trivial single file Java applications. Dependency resolution and library/classpath management doesn't happen magically either. You need an IDE for it.

  4. Anything less than IntelliJ IDEA, or NetBeans, or Eclipse is going to waste hours and days (or months) of your life. I rate them as IntelliJ awesome, Netbeans almost awesome, and Eclipse as "merely ok".

If you don't want a fat IDE, then use Python, and forget about Java. If DrJava works for you it's because you'recould try JEDIT which is a student writing useless demos and learning basictext editor built in Java syntaxthat has lots of lightweight plugins, one or more of them might meet your scripting needs.

You may think you want that, but unless your job is to teach eight year olds, you're going to wish you just stayed with a real IDE like IntelliJ IDEA.

Reasons:

  1. Java IDEs are big and full of features because working with Java without those features is a giant pain.

  2. Code-completion is great. Having something check your style, suggest how to repair your project when it breaks is great. Recovery from errors is a major part of what IDEs give you.

  3. Project build management without an editor means writing an Ant script in XML or in Maven, by hand. Java builds don't happen without build systems, except for trivial single file Java applications. Dependency resolution and library/classpath management doesn't happen magically either. You need an IDE for it.

  4. Anything less than IntelliJ IDEA, or NetBeans, or Eclipse is going to waste hours and days (or months) of your life. I rate them as IntelliJ awesome, Netbeans almost awesome, and Eclipse as "merely ok".

If you don't want a fat IDE, then use Python, and forget about Java. If DrJava works for you it's because you're a student writing useless demos and learning basic Java syntax.

You may think you want that, but unless your job is to teach eight year olds, you're going to wish you just stayed with a real IDE like IntelliJ IDEA.

Reasons:

  1. Java IDEs are big and full of features because working with Java without those features is a giant pain.

  2. Code-completion is great. Having something check your style, suggest how to repair your project when it breaks is great. Recovery from errors is a major part of what IDEs give you.

  3. Project build management without an editor means writing an Ant script in XML or in Maven, by hand. Java builds don't happen without build systems, except for trivial single file Java applications. Dependency resolution and library/classpath management doesn't happen magically either. You need an IDE for it.

  4. Anything less than IntelliJ IDEA, or NetBeans, or Eclipse is going to waste hours and days (or months) of your life. I rate them as IntelliJ awesome, Netbeans almost awesome, and Eclipse as "merely ok".

If you don't want a fat IDE, then you could try JEDIT which is a text editor built in Java that has lots of lightweight plugins, one or more of them might meet your scripting needs.

2 added 25 characters in body
source | link

You may think you want that, but unless your job is to teach eight year olds, you're going to wish you learnedjust stayed with a real IDE like IntelliJ IDEA.

Reasons:

  1. Java IDEs are big and full of features because working with Java without those features is a giant pain.

  2. Code-completion is great. Having something check your style, suggest how to repair your project when it breaks is great. Recovery from errors is a major part of what IDEs give you.

  3. Project build management without an editor means writing an Ant script in XML or in Maven, by hand. Java builds don't happen without build systems, except for trivial single file Java applications. Dependency resolution and library/classpath management doesn't happen magically either. You need an IDE for it.

  4. Anything less than IntelliJ IDEA, or NetBeans, or Eclipse is going to waste hours and days (or months) of your life. I rate them as IntelliJ awesome, Netbeans almost awesome, and Eclipse as "merely ok".

If you don't want a fat IDE, then use Python, and forget about Java. If DrJava works for you it's because you're a student writing useless demos and learning basic Java syntax.

You may think you want that, but unless your job is to teach eight year olds, you're going to wish you learned IntelliJ IDEA.

Reasons:

  1. Java IDEs are big and full of features because working with Java without those features is a giant pain.

  2. Code-completion is great. Having something check your style, suggest how to repair your project when it breaks is great. Recovery from errors is a major part of what IDEs give you.

  3. Project build management without an editor means writing an Ant script in XML or in Maven, by hand. Java builds don't happen without build systems, except for trivial single file Java applications. Dependency resolution and library/classpath management doesn't happen magically either. You need an IDE for it.

  4. Anything less than IntelliJ IDEA, or NetBeans, or Eclipse is going to waste hours and days (or months) of your life. I rate them as IntelliJ awesome, Netbeans almost awesome, and Eclipse as "merely ok".

If you don't want a fat IDE, then use Python, and forget about Java. If DrJava works for you it's because you're a student writing useless demos and learning basic Java syntax.

You may think you want that, but unless your job is to teach eight year olds, you're going to wish you just stayed with a real IDE like IntelliJ IDEA.

Reasons:

  1. Java IDEs are big and full of features because working with Java without those features is a giant pain.

  2. Code-completion is great. Having something check your style, suggest how to repair your project when it breaks is great. Recovery from errors is a major part of what IDEs give you.

  3. Project build management without an editor means writing an Ant script in XML or in Maven, by hand. Java builds don't happen without build systems, except for trivial single file Java applications. Dependency resolution and library/classpath management doesn't happen magically either. You need an IDE for it.

  4. Anything less than IntelliJ IDEA, or NetBeans, or Eclipse is going to waste hours and days (or months) of your life. I rate them as IntelliJ awesome, Netbeans almost awesome, and Eclipse as "merely ok".

If you don't want a fat IDE, then use Python, and forget about Java. If DrJava works for you it's because you're a student writing useless demos and learning basic Java syntax.

1
source | link

You may think you want that, but unless your job is to teach eight year olds, you're going to wish you learned IntelliJ IDEA.

Reasons:

  1. Java IDEs are big and full of features because working with Java without those features is a giant pain.

  2. Code-completion is great. Having something check your style, suggest how to repair your project when it breaks is great. Recovery from errors is a major part of what IDEs give you.

  3. Project build management without an editor means writing an Ant script in XML or in Maven, by hand. Java builds don't happen without build systems, except for trivial single file Java applications. Dependency resolution and library/classpath management doesn't happen magically either. You need an IDE for it.

  4. Anything less than IntelliJ IDEA, or NetBeans, or Eclipse is going to waste hours and days (or months) of your life. I rate them as IntelliJ awesome, Netbeans almost awesome, and Eclipse as "merely ok".

If you don't want a fat IDE, then use Python, and forget about Java. If DrJava works for you it's because you're a student writing useless demos and learning basic Java syntax.