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Nobody's answered so far... it looks like not many people frequent the C++-library-request pages on this site. Anyway, I'll add some potential candidates, or close-to-being-candidates, in this answer for now:

Might be relevant:

  • LEMON , or Library for Efficient Modeling and Optimization in Networks - A "C++ template library providing efficient implementations of common data structures and algorithms with focus on combinatorial optimization tasks connected mainly with graphs and networks." Here's a 2010 presentation describing LEMON.
  • GGL, the Graph Grammar Library - . Here's the manual.
  • Goblin - "A tool chain for handling graphs", including code for graph-related combinatorial optimization algorithms; laying out graphs in space (e.g. layered, orthogonal), graph composition (?), serialization to/from files, vertex and edge attributes and incidence structures. Probably not C++11ish nor involving templates too much.
  • SNAP - The Stanford Network Analysis Platform - on one hand, seems to be pretty focused on a specific application; on the other hand, it might have a pretty-much complete graph representation and manipulation API. There's also a hint it might be based on another, lower-level, graph library.
  • NGraph - A super-simple, single 23 KiB .hpp file, graph library.

Not relevant / not quite relevant:

  • LEDA - A part of a larger codebase of combinatorial algorithms and data structures of the same name. This is commercial software, and even the free edition is closed-source (you can - gasp - buy the source from them). No thank you.
  • OGDF - Open Graph Drawing Framework - Seems to be concerned more with layout, drawing of graphs on a plane. Claims to be an FOSS substitute for LEDA.
  • igraph - A C (as in: not C++) graph library created for use in network analysis. Claims to focus on performance for large-but-not-huge graphs; and seems to have seen significant development over more than a decade. GitHub page. It has some unstable-API C++ bindings named igraphpp.
  • NoCycle - A library for DAG representation. It uses a compact (?) reprsentation of an adjacency map. Probably too different than what I need, and I don't think I "buy" the hype about its representation.
  • libcgraph - Part of the GraphViz graph layout project/toolkit. Note there's also a component named libgraph in there - not sure which uses which.
  • GCT - Graph Class Templates - Another one-header-file barebones library.

It's not impossible that some of the C libraries are good, but I don't think I'm going to spend time wrapping them in C++, not to mention the paucity of abstractions that would be effectively available with them.

See also the following StackOverflow questions:

Nobody's answered so far... it looks like not many people frequent the C++-library-request pages on this site. Anyway, I'll add some potential candidates, or close-to-being-candidates, in this answer for now:

Might be relevant:

  • LEMON , or Library for Efficient Modeling and Optimization in Networks - A "C++ template library providing efficient implementations of common data structures and algorithms with focus on combinatorial optimization tasks connected mainly with graphs and networks." Here's a 2010 presentation describing LEMON.
  • GGL, the Graph Grammar Library - . Here's the manual.
  • Goblin - "A tool chain for handling graphs", including code for graph-related combinatorial optimization algorithms; laying out graphs in space (e.g. layered, orthogonal), graph composition (?), serialization to/from files, vertex and edge attributes and incidence structures. Probably not C++11ish nor involving templates too much.
  • SNAP - The Stanford Network Analysis Platform - on one hand, seems to be pretty focused on a specific application; on the other hand, it might have a pretty-much complete graph representation and manipulation API. There's also a hint it might be based on another, lower-level, graph library.
  • NGraph - A super-simple, single 23 KiB .hpp file, graph library.

Not relevant / not quite relevant:

  • LEDA - A part of a larger codebase of combinatorial algorithms and data structures of the same name. This is commercial software, and even the free edition is closed-source (you can - gasp - buy the source from them). No thank you.
  • OGDF - Open Graph Drawing Framework - Seems to be concerned more with layout, drawing of graphs on a plane. Claims to be an FOSS substitute for LEDA.
  • igraph - A C (as in: not C++) graph library created for use in network analysis. Claims to focus on performance for large-but-not-huge graphs; and seems to have seen significant development over more than a decade. GitHub page. It has some unstable-API C++ bindings named igraphpp.
  • NoCycle - A library for DAG representation. It uses a compact (?) reprsentation of an adjacency map. Probably too different than what I need, and I don't think I "buy" the hype about its representation.
  • libcgraph - Part of the GraphViz graph layout project/toolkit. Note there's also a component named libgraph in there - not sure which uses which.
  • GCT - Graph Class Templates - Another one-header-file barebones library.

It's not impossible that some of the C libraries are good, but I don't think I'm going to spend time wrapping them in C++, not to mention the paucity of abstractions that would be effectively available with them.

See also the following StackOverflow questions:

Nobody's answered so far... it looks like not many people frequent the C++-library-request pages on this site. Anyway, I'll add some potential candidates, or close-to-being-candidates, in this answer for now:

Might be relevant:

  • LEMON , or Library for Efficient Modeling and Optimization in Networks - A "C++ template library providing efficient implementations of common data structures and algorithms with focus on combinatorial optimization tasks connected mainly with graphs and networks." Here's a 2010 presentation describing LEMON.
  • GGL, the Graph Grammar Library - . Here's the manual.
  • Goblin - "A tool chain for handling graphs", including code for graph-related combinatorial optimization algorithms; laying out graphs in space (e.g. layered, orthogonal), graph composition (?), serialization to/from files, vertex and edge attributes and incidence structures. Probably not C++11ish nor involving templates too much.
  • SNAP - The Stanford Network Analysis Platform - on one hand, seems to be pretty focused on a specific application; on the other hand, it might have a pretty-much complete graph representation and manipulation API. There's also a hint it might be based on another, lower-level, graph library.
  • NGraph - A super-simple, single 23 KiB .hpp file, graph library.

Not relevant / not quite relevant:

  • LEDA - A part of a larger codebase of combinatorial algorithms and data structures of the same name. This is commercial software, and even the free edition is closed-source (you can - gasp - buy the source from them). No thank you.
  • OGDF - Open Graph Drawing Framework - Seems to be concerned more with layout, drawing of graphs on a plane. Claims to be an FOSS substitute for LEDA.
  • igraph - A C (as in: not C++) graph library created for use in network analysis. Claims to focus on performance for large-but-not-huge graphs; and seems to have seen significant development over more than a decade. GitHub page. It has some unstable-API C++ bindings named igraphpp.
  • NoCycle - A library for DAG representation. It uses a compact (?) reprsentation of an adjacency map. Probably too different than what I need, and I don't think I "buy" the hype about its representation.
  • libcgraph - Part of the GraphViz graph layout project/toolkit. Note there's also a component named libgraph in there - not sure which uses which.
  • GCT - Graph Class Templates - Another one-header-file barebones library.

It's not impossible that some of the C libraries are good, but I don't think I'm going to spend time wrapping them in C++, not to mention the paucity of abstractions that would be effectively available with them.

See also the following StackOverflow questions:

14 added 8 characters in body
source | link

Nobody's answered so far... it looks like not many people frequent the C++-library-request pages on this site. Anyway, I'll add some potential candidates, or close-to-being-candidates, in this answer for now:

Might be relevant:

  • LEMON , or Library for Efficient Modeling and Optimization in Networks - A "C++ template library providing efficient implementations of common data structures and algorithms with focus on combinatorial optimization tasks connected mainly with graphs and networks." Here's a 2010 presentation describing LEMON.
  • GGL, the Graph Grammar LibraryGrammar Library - . Here's the manual.
  • Goblin - "A tool chain for handling graphs", including code for graph-related combinatorial optimization algorithms; laying out graphs in space (e.g. layered, orthogonal), graph composition (?), serialization to/from files, vertex and edge attributes and incidence structures. Probably not C++11ish nor involving templates too much.
  • SNAP - The Stanford Network Analysis Platform - on one hand, seems to be pretty focused on a specific application; on the other hand, it might have a pretty-much complete graph representation and manipulation API. There's also a hint it might be based on another, lower-level, graph library.
  • NGraph - A super-simple, single 23 KiB .hpp file, graph library.

Not relevant / not quite relevant:

  • LEDA - A part of a larger codebase of combinatorial algorithms and data structures of the same name. This is commercial software, and even the free edition is closed-source (you can - gasp - buy the source from them). No thank you.
  • OGDF - Open Graph Drawing Framework - Seems to be concerned more with layout, drawing of graphs on a plane. Claims to be an FOSS substitute for LEDA.
  • igraph - A C (as in: not C++) graph library created for use in network analysis. Claims to focus on performance for large-but-not-huge graphs; and seems to have seen significant development over more than a decade. GitHub page. It has some unstable-API C++ bindings named igraphpp.
  • NoCycle - A library for DAG representation. It uses a compact (?) reprsentation of an adjacency map. Probably too different than what I need, and I don't think I "buy" the hype about its representation.
  • libcgraph - Part of the GraphViz graph layout project/toolkit. Note there's also a component named libgraph in there - not sure which uses which.
  • GCT - Graph Class Templates - Another one-header-file barebones library.

It's not impossible that some of the C libraries are good, but I don't think I'm going to spend time wrapping them in C++, not to mention the paucity of abstractions that would be effectively available with them.

See also the following StackOverflow questions:

Nobody's answered so far... it looks like not many people frequent the C++-library-request pages on this site. Anyway, I'll add some potential candidates, or close-to-being-candidates, in this answer for now:

Might be relevant:

  • LEMON , or Library for Efficient Modeling and Optimization in Networks - A "C++ template library providing efficient implementations of common data structures and algorithms with focus on combinatorial optimization tasks connected mainly with graphs and networks." Here's a 2010 presentation describing LEMON.
  • GGL, the Graph Grammar Library - . Here's the manual.
  • Goblin - "A tool chain for handling graphs", including code for graph-related combinatorial optimization algorithms; laying out graphs in space (e.g. layered, orthogonal), graph composition (?), serialization to/from files, vertex and edge attributes and incidence structures. Probably not C++11ish nor involving templates too much.
  • SNAP - The Stanford Network Analysis Platform - on one hand, seems to be pretty focused on a specific application; on the other hand, it might have a pretty-much complete graph representation and manipulation API. There's also a hint it might be based on another, lower-level, graph library.
  • NGraph - A super-simple, single 23 KiB .hpp file, graph library.

Not relevant / not quite relevant:

  • LEDA - A part of a larger codebase of combinatorial algorithms and data structures of the same name. This is commercial software, and even the free edition is closed-source (you can - gasp - buy the source from them). No thank you.
  • OGDF - Open Graph Drawing Framework - Seems to be concerned more with layout, drawing of graphs on a plane. Claims to be an FOSS substitute for LEDA.
  • igraph - A C (as in: not C++) graph library created for use in network analysis. Claims to focus on performance for large-but-not-huge graphs; and seems to have seen significant development over more than a decade. GitHub page. It has some unstable-API C++ bindings named igraphpp.
  • NoCycle - A library for DAG representation. It uses a compact (?) reprsentation of an adjacency map. Probably too different than what I need, and I don't think I "buy" the hype about its representation.
  • libcgraph - Part of the GraphViz graph layout project/toolkit. Note there's also a component named libgraph in there - not sure which uses which.
  • GCT - Graph Class Templates - Another one-header-file barebones library.

It's not impossible that some of the C libraries are good, but I don't think I'm going to spend time wrapping them in C++, not to mention the paucity of abstractions that would be effectively available with them.

See also the following StackOverflow questions:

Nobody's answered so far... it looks like not many people frequent the C++-library-request pages on this site. Anyway, I'll add some potential candidates, or close-to-being-candidates, in this answer for now:

Might be relevant:

  • LEMON , or Library for Efficient Modeling and Optimization in Networks - A "C++ template library providing efficient implementations of common data structures and algorithms with focus on combinatorial optimization tasks connected mainly with graphs and networks." Here's a 2010 presentation describing LEMON.
  • GGL, the Graph Grammar Library - . Here's the manual.
  • Goblin - "A tool chain for handling graphs", including code for graph-related combinatorial optimization algorithms; laying out graphs in space (e.g. layered, orthogonal), graph composition (?), serialization to/from files, vertex and edge attributes and incidence structures. Probably not C++11ish nor involving templates too much.
  • SNAP - The Stanford Network Analysis Platform - on one hand, seems to be pretty focused on a specific application; on the other hand, it might have a pretty-much complete graph representation and manipulation API. There's also a hint it might be based on another, lower-level, graph library.
  • NGraph - A super-simple, single 23 KiB .hpp file, graph library.

Not relevant / not quite relevant:

  • LEDA - A part of a larger codebase of combinatorial algorithms and data structures of the same name. This is commercial software, and even the free edition is closed-source (you can - gasp - buy the source from them). No thank you.
  • OGDF - Open Graph Drawing Framework - Seems to be concerned more with layout, drawing of graphs on a plane. Claims to be an FOSS substitute for LEDA.
  • igraph - A C (as in: not C++) graph library created for use in network analysis. Claims to focus on performance for large-but-not-huge graphs; and seems to have seen significant development over more than a decade. GitHub page. It has some unstable-API C++ bindings named igraphpp.
  • NoCycle - A library for DAG representation. It uses a compact (?) reprsentation of an adjacency map. Probably too different than what I need, and I don't think I "buy" the hype about its representation.
  • libcgraph - Part of the GraphViz graph layout project/toolkit. Note there's also a component named libgraph in there - not sure which uses which.
  • GCT - Graph Class Templates - Another one-header-file barebones library.

It's not impossible that some of the C libraries are good, but I don't think I'm going to spend time wrapping them in C++, not to mention the paucity of abstractions that would be effectively available with them.

See also the following StackOverflow questions:

13 added 33 characters in body
source | link

Nobody's answered so far... it looks like not many people frequent the C++-library-request pages on this site. Anyway, I'll add some potential candidates, or close-to-being-candidates, in this answer for now:

Might be relevant:

  • LEMON , or Library for Efficient Modeling and Optimization in Networks - A "C++ template library providing efficient implementations of common data structures and algorithms with focus on combinatorial optimization tasks connected mainly with graphs and networks." Here's a 2010 presentation describing LEMON.
  • GGL, the Graph Grammar Library - . Here's the manual.
  • Goblin - "A tool chain for handling graphs", including code for graph-related combinatorial optimization algorithms; laying out graphs in space (e.g. layered, orthogonal), graph composition (?), serialization to/from files, vertex and edge attributes and incidence structures. Probably not C++11ish nor involving templates too much.
  • SNAP - The Stanford Network Analysis Platform - on one hand, seems to be pretty focused on a specific application; on the other hand, it might have a pretty-much complete graph representation and manipulation API. There's also a hint it might be based on another, lower-level, graph library.
  • NGraph - A super-simple, single 23 KiB .hpp file, graph library.

Not relevant / not quite relevant:

  • LEDA - A part of a larger codebase of combinatorial algorithms and data structures of the same name. This is commercial software, and even the free edition is closed-source (you can - gasp - buy the source from them). No thank you.
  • OGDF - Open Graph Drawing Framework - Seems to be concerned more with layout, drawing of graphs on a plane. Claims to be an FOSS substitute for LEDA.
  • igraph - A C (as in: not C++) graph library created for use in network analysis. Claims to focus on performance for large-but-not-huge graphs; and seems to have seen significant development over more than a decade. GitHub page. It has some unstable-API C++ bindings named igraphpp.
  • NoCycle - A library for DAG representation. It uses a compact (?) reprsentation of an adjacency map. Probably too different than what I need, and I don't think I "buy" the hype about its representation.
  • libcgraph - Part of the GraphViz graph layout project/toolkit. Note there's also a component named libgraph in there - not sure which uses which.
  • GCT - Graph Class Templates - Another one-header-file barebones library.

It's not impossible that some of the C libraries are good, but I don't think I'm going to spend time wrapping them in C++, not to mention the paucity of abstractions that would be effectively available with them.

See also the following StackOverflow questions:

Nobody's answered so far... it looks like not many people frequent this site. Anyway, I'll add some potential candidates, or close-to-being-candidates, in this answer for now:

Might be relevant:

  • LEMON , or Library for Efficient Modeling and Optimization in Networks - A "C++ template library providing efficient implementations of common data structures and algorithms with focus on combinatorial optimization tasks connected mainly with graphs and networks." Here's a 2010 presentation describing LEMON.
  • GGL, the Graph Grammar Library - . Here's the manual.
  • Goblin - "A tool chain for handling graphs", including code for graph-related combinatorial optimization algorithms; laying out graphs in space (e.g. layered, orthogonal), graph composition (?), serialization to/from files, vertex and edge attributes and incidence structures. Probably not C++11ish nor involving templates too much.
  • SNAP - The Stanford Network Analysis Platform - on one hand, seems to be pretty focused on a specific application; on the other hand, it might have a pretty-much complete graph representation and manipulation API. There's also a hint it might be based on another, lower-level, graph library.
  • NGraph - A super-simple, single 23 KiB .hpp file, graph library.

Not relevant / not quite relevant:

  • LEDA - A part of a larger codebase of combinatorial algorithms and data structures of the same name. This is commercial software, and even the free edition is closed-source (you can - gasp - buy the source from them). No thank you.
  • OGDF - Open Graph Drawing Framework - Seems to be concerned more with layout, drawing of graphs on a plane. Claims to be an FOSS substitute for LEDA.
  • igraph - A C (as in: not C++) graph library created for use in network analysis. Claims to focus on performance for large-but-not-huge graphs; and seems to have seen significant development over more than a decade. GitHub page. It has some unstable-API C++ bindings named igraphpp.
  • NoCycle - A library for DAG representation. It uses a compact (?) reprsentation of an adjacency map. Probably too different than what I need, and I don't think I "buy" the hype about its representation.
  • libcgraph - Part of the GraphViz graph layout project/toolkit. Note there's also a component named libgraph in there - not sure which uses which.
  • GCT - Graph Class Templates - Another one-header-file barebones library.

It's not impossible that some of the C libraries are good, but I don't think I'm going to spend time wrapping them in C++, not to mention the paucity of abstractions that would be effectively available with them.

See also the following StackOverflow questions:

Nobody's answered so far... it looks like not many people frequent the C++-library-request pages on this site. Anyway, I'll add some potential candidates, or close-to-being-candidates, in this answer for now:

Might be relevant:

  • LEMON , or Library for Efficient Modeling and Optimization in Networks - A "C++ template library providing efficient implementations of common data structures and algorithms with focus on combinatorial optimization tasks connected mainly with graphs and networks." Here's a 2010 presentation describing LEMON.
  • GGL, the Graph Grammar Library - . Here's the manual.
  • Goblin - "A tool chain for handling graphs", including code for graph-related combinatorial optimization algorithms; laying out graphs in space (e.g. layered, orthogonal), graph composition (?), serialization to/from files, vertex and edge attributes and incidence structures. Probably not C++11ish nor involving templates too much.
  • SNAP - The Stanford Network Analysis Platform - on one hand, seems to be pretty focused on a specific application; on the other hand, it might have a pretty-much complete graph representation and manipulation API. There's also a hint it might be based on another, lower-level, graph library.
  • NGraph - A super-simple, single 23 KiB .hpp file, graph library.

Not relevant / not quite relevant:

  • LEDA - A part of a larger codebase of combinatorial algorithms and data structures of the same name. This is commercial software, and even the free edition is closed-source (you can - gasp - buy the source from them). No thank you.
  • OGDF - Open Graph Drawing Framework - Seems to be concerned more with layout, drawing of graphs on a plane. Claims to be an FOSS substitute for LEDA.
  • igraph - A C (as in: not C++) graph library created for use in network analysis. Claims to focus on performance for large-but-not-huge graphs; and seems to have seen significant development over more than a decade. GitHub page. It has some unstable-API C++ bindings named igraphpp.
  • NoCycle - A library for DAG representation. It uses a compact (?) reprsentation of an adjacency map. Probably too different than what I need, and I don't think I "buy" the hype about its representation.
  • libcgraph - Part of the GraphViz graph layout project/toolkit. Note there's also a component named libgraph in there - not sure which uses which.
  • GCT - Graph Class Templates - Another one-header-file barebones library.

It's not impossible that some of the C libraries are good, but I don't think I'm going to spend time wrapping them in C++, not to mention the paucity of abstractions that would be effectively available with them.

See also the following StackOverflow questions:

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