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I converted about 200 pictures from RAW format and after converting I realized that the pictures had a pink line going down the entire right side of the picture (example). Even though its small, it can still be noticeable. Its like this for all 200 pictures.

Assuming all pictures have the same dimensions, I am looking for software that can auto crop 200 pictures the same way.

Requirements:

  • Must be able to batch convert all 200 pictures at the same time
  • Must be able to read from .JPEG and .JPG formats
  • Must have an easy to use interface (I don't want to manually input cropping dimensions for each 200 pictures)
  • Should be gratis (free) but not a requirement. Open source is nice as well
  • Should be able to choose either to override the original or output to a different directory (I'll be fine with either but at least one of these options must be in place)
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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

ImageMagick is a library and program suite for image display and manipulation. If you can name a raster image format, ImageMagick supports it. It's open source. You can download Windows binaries.

There are several command line tools, including mogrify which applies various transformations to an image file (overwriting the input file) and convert which can convert between image formats and apply various transformations as well (with the output going to a new file).

To remove a rectangle at the edge of an image, shave it with a negative offset. To modify files in place:

mogrify -crop -42+0 *.jpg

To output files in another directory, you can use percent escapes:

convert *.jpg -crop -42+0 elsewhere\%t.%e

There may well be a way to let it detect the width of the pink strip automatically, but that's too advanced for me.

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If you prefer a GUI option, IrfanView is a free and lightweight graphics viewer with some powerful functions. It includes the ability to batch convert files. You can find the option under the File menu or by using the shortcut key B.

enter image description here

Then you can add all the files in a directory or import the filenames from a text file. To crop the images, select Batch conversion or Batch conversion - Rename result files if you also wish to rename the pictures. Then, check the Use advanced options for bulk resize box and click the Advanced button.

enter image description here

Check the CROP box, and fill in the values you wish to trim. I suggest you perform a test run on one image to verify your numbers first. Hit OK, select an output directory (or you can first choose to Overwrite existing files by checking the corresponding box under the MISCELLANEOUS section), then click Start Batch.

Note that the Auto crop borders option only works on white and transparent background. It would be useful if you could recreate the images with a white strip instead of pink.

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If all pictures are the same size you can try FastStone Photo Resizer. Inter alia, it has a crop function.

I found this tool very usefull for working with batches of images some time ago.

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Of course, if you have access to Photoshop, you could create a simple Action to crop X pixels off of the right side of an image, then run a batch process with that action on your entire folder of images.

Clearly a higher-ticket way to handle it, but if you or someone in your office already has Photoshop, it should be a pretty quick matter.

Matt

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